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Singing for Health

Singing for Health

This is an interactive session of music. Graham will play and sing the songs at the same time the words are projected on the screen so as everybody can sing along.

Singing those songs that you remember as a younger person can wake up memories and rejuvenate.

The songs are picked that are well known and from that imprint-able age – songs from yesteryear.

A coordinated programme of singing and vocalising has health benefits in several areas:

*Physical health – proper breathing and posture improve overall comfort, confidence, and ability to perform other physical tasks. Vocal excercises target specific body parts to improve lung capacity, fitness and vocal control.

*Emotional health – raising the spirits, improving confidence, remembering good memories and feelings, having fun with other participants.

*Spiritual health – reinforcing positive ideas and values, connecting with life-affirming values.

* Just having fun!!

The Singing for Health sessions are led by Graham Horne, an experienced musician and music teacher who has two LTCL music diplomas. Graham chooses songs and exercises relevant to participants’ age group, level of physical fitness and flexibility, and experience.

The sessions are interactive – participants can request favourite songs.

Drum and Vocal Therapy can be hugely valuable for those who have difficulties in hearing, seeing, moving, thinking or responding. And at the same time, the smartest kid on the block can join in.  Rhythm work crosses many boundaries.

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Seated Yoga for seniors

Seated Yoga for seniors

Chair Yoga for Seniors.

With Maureen McKain IYTA dips.

Maureen has been teaching in New Zealand & overseas for 36 years.  Learn Yoga poses that work on every muscle, gland & nerves in the body. Yoga works not only on the outer self but also on our inner self mentally, physically & spiritually bringing all these aspects into balance with regular practise.
Maureen will teach how to breathe more fully bringing extra oxygen into the lungs to nourish all the cells. Also cleansing breaths & breathing techniques for better memory & clearer thinking!

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Playing In A Group

Playing In A Group

We have been working with a group of adults from Te Roopu Trust, which supports people with intellectual disabilities.  Three men have been learning to play music in a group.  They have formed a band called Messenger, in which Barney and Nigel do vocals and Anaru plays drums.  Tom, Nick and Dave work with these guys, who have come such a long way.   Messenger are now regularly playing at the Raglan Musicians Club.  And the tutors are becoming their session musicians.

The men come and make music in our Raglan studio once a week. We vary what we do. At some sessions we practice covers that we can perform.

Other sessions focus on songwriting, and trying out new instruments. Barney is learning to play the harmonica.

For Inspiration – see Young@heart, a documentary film showing a choir of octogenarians singing rock songs, and PKN, a Finnish punk group made up of people with Down Syndrome, autistim spectrum disorders and other challenges, who are trying to take part in the 2015 Eurovision Song Contest.

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One On One

One On One

We offer one on one music sessions for specific clients.  The sessions and activities are highly flexible, and tailored to an individual’s needs and preferences. Just about any instrument can be used, in any tuning that’s appropriate. From rehabilitation to music for special needs, there is probably some way music can help.

Drum and Vocal Therapy can be hugely valuable for those who have difficulties in hearing, seeing, moving, thinking or responding. And at the same time, the smartest kid on the block can join in.  Rhythm work crosses many boundaries.

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Music for Deaf Ears

Music for Deaf Ears

In the video above Carl is on the drums. Carl is profoundly deaf. The video shows him drumming to a bass line by Dave and percussion by Nathan.

Check out world-famous percussionist Evelyn Glennie, who plays with symphony orchestras. She has been profoundly deaf since about 10 years old.

Music is felt as well as heard.  When someone has no, or little, hearing, other senses become more acute. The lower the tone, the more one feels it, so bass and drums are great instruments for deaf ears.  We have taught a few deaf people to drum and to play bass, and have played with deaf students in our band.  Our goal is to form a band made up of deaf people.

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Literacy & Numeracy

Literacy & Numeracy

Music for literacy and numeracy together with speech development.

These courses are designed for developmental delay for preschool  to below 8 years old level of cognitive development.. We can mix the groups and still give developmentally appropriate tasks to the individual.

Current brain research is helping us understand of how children learn. Neuroscience has allowed us to see the effect of music on the brain.

Music and literacy

Musical participation stimulates brain activity, involving the visual, auditory, and kinesthetic senses. The relationship between language and music has been recognized throughout history, particularly as words are expressed through melody and rhythm. Melody is built on the natural phrasing, rhythm, pitch, accent, syllabication, and rhyme of language.

Music and math are linked through the natural proportions of rhythm and acoustics.  Music will help you remember numerical problems, using drumming and chanting.

We use projectors, internet and computers as well as instruments.

. Music can help you speak

Our courses are very practical . We start off with some kinesthetic exercises then using music melody and rhythm coach students into pronunciation using phonemes ,syllables and words  to music to reading and where possible writing.

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Alive Inside

Alive Inside

We named this session after an amazing documentary, Alive Inside. You can freely stream from the internet – just key in “Alive Inside streaming” and it will send you to a free site. It’s totally legal. In our “Alive Inside” session we take the ideas from this documentary and add a bit – engaging with people using live music. Alive Inside shows people being drawn out of the slumber of dementia using recorded music of their “time “. The results are very moving, watch it and you will see…

Waking Henry from the documentary film Alive  Inside

We have started going into rest homes that care for people who have dementia. Here’s how it works: Our two musicians play and sing songs from the era of the residents. At the moment our musos are Graham and Alice – between them they play guitar, ukulele and violin. As the music is in progress, the “Engager”  walks among the residents, finding ways to engage the ones who are not responding straight away.

We are not allowed to take photos to show you the magical effect the music can have, so here is a description of one case:

We had just entered a high dependency part of this rest home, and the nurse warned me that we could encounter “challenging behaviour”. As we got underway, Graham and Alice were kicking up a storm, singing “You Are My Sunshine”, accompanied by a very vocal lady. As I circulated around joking and singing with various patients displaying varying states of lucidity, I came across a man whose head was slumped forward with that waxy expressionless regard.  The lights were off and his curtains drawn in his world. I took his hand and sang to him. Quickly the wax melted from his expression and he opened his eyes and started singing.  The lights were switched on and the curtains were opened.

It must be said that the nurses, caregivers and everyone else who works with people with dementia are very special people.  When we are making music they get in on the act – they dance with those who can, sing with those who can’t.

We’d love to be able to visit more rest homes that care for people with dementia. In order to do that, we need more musicians on board.  If you’d like to be part of this amazing project, please contact Dave – see the CONTACT tab of this website.

Waking Henry from the documentary film Alive  Inside

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African Drumming

African Drumming

Drumming, rhythm and chanting tap into the primordial parts of the brain and connect to  everyday functions that we take for granted.  From banging out rhythms to communicate over long distances, to the complex rhythms and cadences of speech.

Drum and Vocal Therapy can be hugely valuable for those who have difficulties in hearing, seeing, moving, thinking or responding. And at the same time, the smartest kid on the block can join in.  Rhythm work crosses many boundaries.

In our African drumming sessions we combine the rhythms of the African drum with chanting, singing and speaking.  Our musicians are always inventing games involving rhythm, actions and vocals.

This single instrument can possess qualities of sound and tone irresistible enough to reach out in a direct, uncomplicated manner. Music contributes to: reasoning ability, reading skills, feelings and response, personal fulfillment, language development, the promotion of communication, motor control and physical well-being, positive attitudes to learning, socializing and pleasurable experiences in a group. This also enhances and focuses on sensory needs.

People who experience severe obstacles in forming relationships with other children, adults and their environment can achieve security and joy in making music through African drumming and chanting.

  • Developing speech through rhyme and rhythm
    African drumming captivates and maintains attention
  • African drumming and chanting stimulates and utilizes many parts of the brain encouraging new neural networks, therefore learning.
  • It is easily adapted to, and can be reflective of, a person’s abilities.
  • It provides a meaningful, enjoyable context for repetition.
  • Our African drumming sessions provide a social context – it sets up a safe, structured setting for verbal and nonverbal communication.
  • Music is an effective memory aid.
  • It supports and encourages movement, enhances fine and gross motor skills.
  • Music taps into memories and emotions, helps increase self esteem
  • It relaxes people, so for instance the spasticity of someone with cerebral palsy can be helped through drumming.
  • It can work wonders with autistic people.

Music is success-oriented – people of all ability levels can participate and best of all, it is great fun.

 

African Drumming Workshop

Star Sherret and Nathan Bergman